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Kalesh, K S; Shareef, S M; Mathew, S P; Chemburkar, M S

Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 562, Kerala, India.

Key words: crop quality, crop yield, fruits, grafting, rootstocks, sapodillas, vegetative propagation

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 23-24.

Abstract: Propagation experiments were carried out in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, during 1999-2002 with C. lanceolatum as a new rootstock for sapota (A. zapota [Manilkara zapota]). Grafted plants were grown in different agro-climatic conditions of the Kerala State and had good fruit quality and yield. C. lanceolatum proved one of the best rootstocks for sapota.
Altintas, S; Bal, U

Department of Horticulture, Tekirdag Faculty of Agriculture, Trakya University, Tekirdag, Turkey.

Key words: application rates, crop yield, cucumbers, cultivars, fruits, fungal antagonists, seedlings, seeds, yield components

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 25-28.

Abstract: A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of Trichoderma harzianum applications on yield and fruit characteristics of the cucumber cultivars Y-43-F1, Y-44-F1 and Y-135-F1. T. harzianum, obtained as a commercially available product (Trichoflow WP; 108 cfu/g) was applied to the soil root zone at 4, 10 and 24 g/m2. Observations were made on total yield (g/plant), early yield (g/plant), fruit weight (g/fruit), number of fruits per plant, number of early fruits per plant, mean fruit length (cm) and mean fruit diameter (mm). The main effect of dosage was significant only for total yield for which the 4 g/m rate resulted in the highest total yield per plant (2162.44 g) followed by 24 g/m, 10 g/m and control (1931.67, 1859.11 and 1499.67 g/plant, respectively). Early yield was also positively affected by T. harzianum at 10 g/m2, with an early yield of 1130.56 g/plant. The cultivar main effect, except for the mean fruit diameter, was significant. Interaction between application rates and cultivars was
Altintas, S; Bal, U

Department of Horticulture, Tekirdag Faculty of Agriculture, Trakya University, Tekirdag, Turkey.

Key words: application rates, crop yield, cucumbers, cultivars, fruits, fungal antagonists, seedlings, seeds, yield components

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 25-28.

Abstract: A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of Trichoderma harzianum applications on yield and fruit characteristics of the cucumber cultivars Y-43-F1, Y-44-F1 and Y-135-F1. T. harzianum, obtained as a commercially available product (Trichoflow WP; 108 cfu/g) was applied to the soil root zone at 4, 10 and 24 g/m2. Observations were made on total yield (g/plant), early yield (g/plant), fruit weight (g/fruit), number of fruits per plant, number of early fruits per plant, mean fruit length (cm) and mean fruit diameter (mm). The main effect of dosage was significant only for total yield for which the 4 g/m rate resulted in the highest total yield per plant (2162.44 g) followed by 24 g/m, 10 g/m and control (1931.67, 1859.11 and 1499.67 g/plant, respectively). Early yield was also positively affected by T. harzianum at 10 g/m2, with an early yield of 1130.56 g/plant. The cultivar main effect, except for the mean fruit diameter, was significant. Interaction between application rates and cultivars was
Satisha, J; Prakash, G S

Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, Karnataka, India.

Key words: budding, cultivars, genetic variation, grapes, plant water relations, rootstocks, water use efficiency

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 29-33.

Abstract: Results are presented of 3 separate experiments conducted in Bangalore, Karnataka, India, during 2002-03 and 2003-04 to investigate the occurrence of variability in grape cultivars (Flame Seedless, Thompson Seedless, Sharad Seedless and Tas-A-Ganesh), rootstocks (Dog Ridge, 1613 C, Salt Creek, St. George and VC clone) and buddings in respect of physiological behaviour and carbon isotope discrimination (CID). There was genetic variability in water use efficiency (WUE) with respect to CID. The behaviour of genotypes differed significantly in CID before and after budding on different rootstocks. Dog Ridge rootstock was known to increase WUE of Flame Seedless and Sharad Seedless when CID and other physiological parameters were compared. However, Thompson Seedless increased its WUE when budded on Dog Ridge, which is confirmed by the least CID in this combination at 50% stress.
Satisha, J; Prakash, G S

Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, Karnataka, India.

Key words: budding, cultivars, genetic variation, grapes, plant water relations, rootstocks, water use efficiency

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 29-33.

Abstract: Results are presented of 3 separate experiments conducted in Bangalore, Karnataka, India, during 2002-03 and 2003-04 to investigate the occurrence of variability in grape cultivars (Flame Seedless, Thompson Seedless, Sharad Seedless and Tas-A-Ganesh), rootstocks (Dog Ridge, 1613 C, Salt Creek, St. George and VC clone) and buddings in respect of physiological behaviour and carbon isotope discrimination (CID). There was genetic variability in water use efficiency (WUE) with respect to CID. The behaviour of genotypes differed significantly in CID before and after budding on different rootstocks. Dog Ridge rootstock was known to increase WUE of Flame Seedless and Sharad Seedless when CID and other physiological parameters were compared. However, Thompson Seedless increased its WUE when budded on Dog Ridge, which is confirmed by the least CID in this combination at 50% stress.
Esmaeil Chamani; Ahmad Khalighi; Joyce, D C; Irving, D E; Zamani, Z A; Younes Mostofi; Mohsen Kafi

Centre for Native Floriculture, School of Agronomy and Horticulture, The University of Queensland, Gatton Queensland 4343, Australia.

Key words: cut flowers, ethylene, ethylene production, plant growth regulators, roses, senescence, silver thiosulfate, vase life

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 3-7.

Abstract: A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of ethylene and anti-ethylene treatments on the postharvest life of cut rose cv. First Red flowers. The treatments comprised: exogenous ethylene applied at 1, 10 and 100 micro l/litre for 48 h at 22 degrees C. Ethylene at different concentrations reduced postharvest life, with 100 micro l/litre having the greatest effect. Ethylene production measurements suggested that First Red is climacteric during senescence. Pre-treatment of First Red flowers with 0.5 mM silver thiosulfate (STS) for 2 h at 22 degrees C increased vase life, but pre-treatment with 1 micro l/litre 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) did not. Pre-treatment of First Red with 0.5 mM STS and, to a lesser extent, 1 micro l/litre 1-MCP for 2 h at 22 degrees C, protected flowers from subsequent exposure to 10 micro l/litre ethylene. Maximum vase life in both ethylene-treated and non-ethylene-treated First Red flowers was obtained with 0.5 mM STS.
Esmaeil Chamani; Ahmad Khalighi; Joyce, D C; Irving, D E; Zamani, Z A; Younes Mostofi; Mohsen Kafi

Centre for Native Floriculture, School of Agronomy and Horticulture, The University of Queensland, Gatton Queensland 4343, Australia.

Key words: cut flowers, ethylene, ethylene production, plant growth regulators, roses, senescence, silver thiosulfate, vase life

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 3-7.

Abstract: A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of ethylene and anti-ethylene treatments on the postharvest life of cut rose cv. First Red flowers. The treatments comprised: exogenous ethylene applied at 1, 10 and 100 micro l/litre for 48 h at 22 degrees C. Ethylene at different concentrations reduced postharvest life, with 100 micro l/litre having the greatest effect. Ethylene production measurements suggested that First Red is climacteric during senescence. Pre-treatment of First Red flowers with 0.5 mM silver thiosulfate (STS) for 2 h at 22 degrees C increased vase life, but pre-treatment with 1 micro l/litre 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) did not. Pre-treatment of First Red with 0.5 mM STS and, to a lesser extent, 1 micro l/litre 1-MCP for 2 h at 22 degrees C, protected flowers from subsequent exposure to 10 micro l/litre ethylene. Maximum vase life in both ethylene-treated and non-ethylene-treated First Red flowers was obtained with 0.5 mM STS.
Mishra, D K; Mishra, H R; Yadava, L P

K.A. Post Graduate Degree College, Allahabad (UP), India.

Key words: application methods, application rates, branches, flowering, growth, growth retardants, paclobutrazol, plant development, plant growth regulators, plant height, root shoot ratio, roots, shoots

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 34-37.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted during 2002-03 in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India, to determine the optimum dose (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 ppm) and method of application (root dip, soil drench and foliar spray) of paclobutrazol to improve the growth, flowering and aesthetic value of China aster (Callistephus chinensis) cv. Poornima. Paclobutrazol at 200 ppm as soil drench was the most effective in retarding plant height. The highest number of branches per plant was observed with 25 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench while lower number of branches per plant was observed with 200 ppm as soil drench. The number of leaves and total leaf area per plant significantly decreased with increased concentration of paclobutrazol irrespective of the methods of application. The soil drench method registered maximum enhancement of root:shoot ratio than foliar spray and root dip at all levels of paclobutrazol. Maximum enhancement of root:shoot length ratio was observed due to 200 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench method. The maximum d
Mishra, D K; Mishra, H R; Yadava, L P

K.A. Post Graduate Degree College, Allahabad (UP), India.

Key words: application methods, application rates, branches, flowering, growth, growth retardants, paclobutrazol, plant development, plant growth regulators, plant height, root shoot ratio, roots, shoots

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 34-37.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted during 2002-03 in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India, to determine the optimum dose (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 ppm) and method of application (root dip, soil drench and foliar spray) of paclobutrazol to improve the growth, flowering and aesthetic value of China aster (Callistephus chinensis) cv. Poornima. Paclobutrazol at 200 ppm as soil drench was the most effective in retarding plant height. The highest number of branches per plant was observed with 25 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench while lower number of branches per plant was observed with 200 ppm as soil drench. The number of leaves and total leaf area per plant significantly decreased with increased concentration of paclobutrazol irrespective of the methods of application. The soil drench method registered maximum enhancement of root:shoot ratio than foliar spray and root dip at all levels of paclobutrazol. Maximum enhancement of root:shoot length ratio was observed due to 200 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench method. The maximum d
Mishra, S K; Singh, R P

Department of Plant Pathology, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar - 263 145, India.

Key words: biological control agents, edible fungi, fungal antagonists, mushrooms, plant extracts, plant pathogenic fungi, plant pathogens

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 38-42.

Abstract: Botanical biocides in forms of water, methanol and glycerol diluted plant extracts (WDPEs, MDPEs and GDPEs, respectively) of 27 botanicals, 10 fluorescent pseudomonad isolates (FPIs) and an actinomycete isolate (AI), were evaluated in vitro against Trichoderma viride and Agaricus bisporus. Among these, the water diluted extract (5%) of Lantana camara (WDELc) reduced the radial growth of T. viride by 28.57% along with a 38.61% growth promotion of A. bisporus. However, glycerol diluted extract (1%) of Cleome viscosa (GDECv) inhibited the growth of T. viride and A. bisporus completely. In the case of bacterial biocides, fluorescent pseudomonad isolate II (FPI-II) was effective and reduced the linear growth of T. viride by approximately 73.68% and enhanced the growth of A. bisporus by 27.59%. An actinomycete isolate showed antagonistic effect against T. viride and A. bisporus as it reduced the growth of both the fungi by approximately 7.10 and 20%, respectively. Under crop conditions, the combination of FPI-II +
Mishra, S K; Singh, R P

Department of Plant Pathology, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar - 263 145, India.

Key words: biological control agents, edible fungi, fungal antagonists, mushrooms, plant extracts, plant pathogenic fungi, plant pathogens

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 38-42.

Abstract: Botanical biocides in forms of water, methanol and glycerol diluted plant extracts (WDPEs, MDPEs and GDPEs, respectively) of 27 botanicals, 10 fluorescent pseudomonad isolates (FPIs) and an actinomycete isolate (AI), were evaluated in vitro against Trichoderma viride and Agaricus bisporus. Among these, the water diluted extract (5%) of Lantana camara (WDELc) reduced the radial growth of T. viride by 28.57% along with a 38.61% growth promotion of A. bisporus. However, glycerol diluted extract (1%) of Cleome viscosa (GDECv) inhibited the growth of T. viride and A. bisporus completely. In the case of bacterial biocides, fluorescent pseudomonad isolate II (FPI-II) was effective and reduced the linear growth of T. viride by approximately 73.68% and enhanced the growth of A. bisporus by 27.59%. An actinomycete isolate showed antagonistic effect against T. viride and A. bisporus as it reduced the growth of both the fungi by approximately 7.10 and 20%, respectively. Under crop conditions, the combination of FPI-II +
Paramesh, T H; Sona Chowdhury

Division of Ornamental Crops, Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, India.

Key words: benzyladenine, callus, carnations, culture media, explants, gamma radiation, gibberellic acid, in vitro culture, in vitro regeneration, irradiation, leaves, micropropagation, mutagenesis, NAA, plant growth regulators, survival, thidiazuron

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 43-45.

Abstract: In vitro shootlets of carnation (cv. IIHRS-1) were subjected to irradiation with gamma dosage of 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy. In vitro shootlets required for the irradiation were generated on MS media supplemented with 0.25 mg BAP [benzyladenine], 0.1 mg NAA and 0.25 gibberellic acid/l. From irradiated shootlets, leaves were excised and used as explants for further culturing. Leaves were horizontally cut into half. The region adhering to stem was considered as the leaf base and the region that is away from the stem was considered as the leaf tip. The leaf tip and leaf base were incubated on MS media supplemented with (1) 1.0 mg thidiazuron (TDZ) and 0.1 mg NAA/l (M5) and (2) 0.3 mg TDZ, 1.0 mg BAP and 0.1 mg NAA/l (M6). Weekly observations were recorded for survival percentage, callus formation, regenerated shootlets and expansion of leaf area. The results indicated gamma-radiation at 40 Gy to be the ideal dosage for mutagenesis when mutagenesis was used in combination with regeneration. Survival percentage decrease
Paramesh, T H; Sona Chowdhury

Division of Ornamental Crops, Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, India.

Key words: benzyladenine, callus, carnations, culture media, explants, gamma radiation, gibberellic acid, in vitro culture, in vitro regeneration, irradiation, leaves, micropropagation, mutagenesis, NAA, plant growth regulators, survival, thidiazuron

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 43-45.

Abstract: In vitro shootlets of carnation (cv. IIHRS-1) were subjected to irradiation with gamma dosage of 20, 40, 60 and 80 Gy. In vitro shootlets required for the irradiation were generated on MS media supplemented with 0.25 mg BAP [benzyladenine], 0.1 mg NAA and 0.25 gibberellic acid/l. From irradiated shootlets, leaves were excised and used as explants for further culturing. Leaves were horizontally cut into half. The region adhering to stem was considered as the leaf base and the region that is away from the stem was considered as the leaf tip. The leaf tip and leaf base were incubated on MS media supplemented with (1) 1.0 mg thidiazuron (TDZ) and 0.1 mg NAA/l (M5) and (2) 0.3 mg TDZ, 1.0 mg BAP and 0.1 mg NAA/l (M6). Weekly observations were recorded for survival percentage, callus formation, regenerated shootlets and expansion of leaf area. The results indicated gamma-radiation at 40 Gy to be the ideal dosage for mutagenesis when mutagenesis was used in combination with regeneration. Survival percentage decrease
Singla, M L; Jain, S C; Shweta Sharma; Angra, S K

Central Scientific Instruments Organization, Sector 30-C, Chandigarh - 30, India.

Key words: absorbance, apples, cultivars, monitoring, nondestructive testing, plant disorders, techniques, transmission, water core

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 46-48.

Abstract: This paper presents the transmission technique, which has been designed and developed for the study of water core in apple cultivars Red Delicious and Golden Delicious of Himachal Pradesh, India. The principle of this method is to measure the optical density of the sample at 2 selected wavelengths and computation of the optical density difference. It has been observed that Golden Delicious is more prone to water core than Red Delicious. The technique is simple and can be conveniently implemented to develop an on-line instrument to monitor water core in apples.
Singla, M L; Jain, S C; Shweta Sharma; Angra, S K

Central Scientific Instruments Organization, Sector 30-C, Chandigarh - 30, India.

Key words: absorbance, apples, cultivars, monitoring, nondestructive testing, plant disorders, techniques, transmission, water core

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 46-48.

Abstract: This paper presents the transmission technique, which has been designed and developed for the study of water core in apple cultivars Red Delicious and Golden Delicious of Himachal Pradesh, India. The principle of this method is to measure the optical density of the sample at 2 selected wavelengths and computation of the optical density difference. It has been observed that Golden Delicious is more prone to water core than Red Delicious. The technique is simple and can be conveniently implemented to develop an on-line instrument to monitor water core in apples.

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