SELECTED CONTENTS

 Journal of Applied Horticulture Selected Contents of Year

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Hossain, A B M S; Mizutani, F; Onguso, J M; Yamada, H

The Experimental Farm, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, 498, Hattaji, Matsuyama City, Ehime 799-2424, Japan.

Key words: buds, chlorophyll, climatic seasons, crop quality, crop yield, fruit set, fruits, peaches, plant development, pruning, regrowth, shoots, summer, winter

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 11-15.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted in Japan, to compare regenerated shoot growth, pruned shoot weight, chlorophyll content, bud formation, fruit set, fruit yield and quality in summer- and winter-pruned peach (cv. AB-1) trees. Summer pruning comprised heading cut, removal of vigorous and current season shoots on 24 July 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003 after harvest. Winter pruning was conducted in February-March 2001, 2002, 2003 and 2004. The weight of shoots removed by summer pruning was smaller than winter pruning. The pruned shoot weight gradually decreased both in summer-pruned and winter-pruned trees. The regenerated shoot number was less and regrowth stopped within 2 months after summer pruning. Regenerated shoot length after summer pruning increased until October. Chlorophyll was higher in summer- than in winter-pruned trees in November. Leaf drop was 2 months earlier in winter- than in summer-pruned trees. The flowers were less in summer- than in winter-pruned trees. Fruit set was recorded in 2003 and 2004, and wa
Cole, J T; Cole, J C; Conway, K E

Department of Horticulture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA.

Key words: chemical control, chlorothalonil, copper hydroxide, cultivars, disease resistance, fungal diseases, fungicides, mancozeb, myclobutanil, plant disease control, plant diseases, plant pathogenic fungi, plant pathogens, surfactants, varietal susceptibility

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 16-19.

Abstract: Laboratory and field experiments were conducted in Stillwater, Oklahoma and Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA, from May to August 2000, to determine the effectiveness of different fungicides applied with and without the surfactant Hyper-ActiveTM in controlling anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides [Glomerella cingulata] on Euonymus fortunei cultivars Emerald Gaiety, Emerald 'n Gold and Emerald Surprise. The fungicides tested were mancozeb, copper hydroxide, trifloxystrobin, chlorothalonil, myclobutanil and azoxystrobin. These fungicides were also incorporated into potato dextrose agar to determine the effective concentration to obtain 50% inhibition (EC50) of C. gloeosporioides mycelial growth. In the field, chlorothalonil and mancozeb were the most efficacious of the fungicides tested. The presence or absence of the surfactant Hyper-ActiveTM in fungicide spray solutions did not affect control of anthracnose symptoms. Cultivars varied in susceptibility to anthracnose. At Fayetteville, less anthracnos
Cole, J T; Cole, J C; Conway, K E

Department of Horticulture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA.

Key words: chemical control, chlorothalonil, copper hydroxide, cultivars, disease resistance, fungal diseases, fungicides, mancozeb, myclobutanil, plant disease control, plant diseases, plant pathogenic fungi, plant pathogens, surfactants, varietal susceptibility

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 16-19.

Abstract: Laboratory and field experiments were conducted in Stillwater, Oklahoma and Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA, from May to August 2000, to determine the effectiveness of different fungicides applied with and without the surfactant Hyper-ActiveTM in controlling anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides [Glomerella cingulata] on Euonymus fortunei cultivars Emerald Gaiety, Emerald 'n Gold and Emerald Surprise. The fungicides tested were mancozeb, copper hydroxide, trifloxystrobin, chlorothalonil, myclobutanil and azoxystrobin. These fungicides were also incorporated into potato dextrose agar to determine the effective concentration to obtain 50% inhibition (EC50) of C. gloeosporioides mycelial growth. In the field, chlorothalonil and mancozeb were the most efficacious of the fungicides tested. The presence or absence of the surfactant Hyper-ActiveTM in fungicide spray solutions did not affect control of anthracnose symptoms. Cultivars varied in susceptibility to anthracnose. At Fayetteville, less anthracnos
Dunford, N T; Silva Vazquez, R

Food and Agricultural Products Research and Technology Center, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Room 103, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA.

Key words: chemical composition, crop growth stage, crop yield, essential oil plants, essential oils, growth, monoterpenoids, plant composition, plant water relations, thymol, water stress

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 20-22.

Abstract: A greenhouse study was carried out to investigate the effect of moisture on the growth and thymol and carvacrol contents of Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri) under controlled conditions. There were 4 watering schemes (0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 l water per pot per 15 days) and 3 growth phases, i.e. seedling (30 days after transplant (DAT)), full flowering (60 DAT) and maturity (90 DAT). The crop yield increased significantly with increasing moisture and age of the plant. Although on an average, the older plants contained less oil than the younger plants, the differences were not statistically significant. The total thymol and carvacrol contents of oregano oils obtained from younger plants were higher than that of the mature plants. The amount of water received by the plants did not have a significant effect on the thymol and carvacrol contents of the oil.
Dunford, N T; Silva Vazquez, R

Food and Agricultural Products Research and Technology Center, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Room 103, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA.

Key words: chemical composition, crop growth stage, crop yield, essential oil plants, essential oils, growth, monoterpenoids, plant composition, plant water relations, thymol, water stress

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 20-22.

Abstract: A greenhouse study was carried out to investigate the effect of moisture on the growth and thymol and carvacrol contents of Mexican oregano (Lippia berlandieri) under controlled conditions. There were 4 watering schemes (0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 l water per pot per 15 days) and 3 growth phases, i.e. seedling (30 days after transplant (DAT)), full flowering (60 DAT) and maturity (90 DAT). The crop yield increased significantly with increasing moisture and age of the plant. Although on an average, the older plants contained less oil than the younger plants, the differences were not statistically significant. The total thymol and carvacrol contents of oregano oils obtained from younger plants were higher than that of the mature plants. The amount of water received by the plants did not have a significant effect on the thymol and carvacrol contents of the oil.
Kalesh, K S; Shareef, S M; Mathew, S P; Chemburkar, M S

Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 562, Kerala, India.

Key words: crop quality, crop yield, fruits, grafting, rootstocks, sapodillas, vegetative propagation

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 23-24.

Abstract: Propagation experiments were carried out in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, during 1999-2002 with C. lanceolatum as a new rootstock for sapota (A. zapota [Manilkara zapota]). Grafted plants were grown in different agro-climatic conditions of the Kerala State and had good fruit quality and yield. C. lanceolatum proved one of the best rootstocks for sapota.
Kalesh, K S; Shareef, S M; Mathew, S P; Chemburkar, M S

Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 562, Kerala, India.

Key words: crop quality, crop yield, fruits, grafting, rootstocks, sapodillas, vegetative propagation

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 23-24.

Abstract: Propagation experiments were carried out in Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, during 1999-2002 with C. lanceolatum as a new rootstock for sapota (A. zapota [Manilkara zapota]). Grafted plants were grown in different agro-climatic conditions of the Kerala State and had good fruit quality and yield. C. lanceolatum proved one of the best rootstocks for sapota.
Altintas, S; Bal, U

Department of Horticulture, Tekirdag Faculty of Agriculture, Trakya University, Tekirdag, Turkey.

Key words: application rates, crop yield, cucumbers, cultivars, fruits, fungal antagonists, seedlings, seeds, yield components

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 25-28.

Abstract: A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of Trichoderma harzianum applications on yield and fruit characteristics of the cucumber cultivars Y-43-F1, Y-44-F1 and Y-135-F1. T. harzianum, obtained as a commercially available product (Trichoflow WP; 108 cfu/g) was applied to the soil root zone at 4, 10 and 24 g/m2. Observations were made on total yield (g/plant), early yield (g/plant), fruit weight (g/fruit), number of fruits per plant, number of early fruits per plant, mean fruit length (cm) and mean fruit diameter (mm). The main effect of dosage was significant only for total yield for which the 4 g/m rate resulted in the highest total yield per plant (2162.44 g) followed by 24 g/m, 10 g/m and control (1931.67, 1859.11 and 1499.67 g/plant, respectively). Early yield was also positively affected by T. harzianum at 10 g/m2, with an early yield of 1130.56 g/plant. The cultivar main effect, except for the mean fruit diameter, was significant. Interaction between application rates and cultivars was
Altintas, S; Bal, U

Department of Horticulture, Tekirdag Faculty of Agriculture, Trakya University, Tekirdag, Turkey.

Key words: application rates, crop yield, cucumbers, cultivars, fruits, fungal antagonists, seedlings, seeds, yield components

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 25-28.

Abstract: A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study the effects of Trichoderma harzianum applications on yield and fruit characteristics of the cucumber cultivars Y-43-F1, Y-44-F1 and Y-135-F1. T. harzianum, obtained as a commercially available product (Trichoflow WP; 108 cfu/g) was applied to the soil root zone at 4, 10 and 24 g/m2. Observations were made on total yield (g/plant), early yield (g/plant), fruit weight (g/fruit), number of fruits per plant, number of early fruits per plant, mean fruit length (cm) and mean fruit diameter (mm). The main effect of dosage was significant only for total yield for which the 4 g/m rate resulted in the highest total yield per plant (2162.44 g) followed by 24 g/m, 10 g/m and control (1931.67, 1859.11 and 1499.67 g/plant, respectively). Early yield was also positively affected by T. harzianum at 10 g/m2, with an early yield of 1130.56 g/plant. The cultivar main effect, except for the mean fruit diameter, was significant. Interaction between application rates and cultivars was
Satisha, J; Prakash, G S

Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, Karnataka, India.

Key words: budding, cultivars, genetic variation, grapes, plant water relations, rootstocks, water use efficiency

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 29-33.

Abstract: Results are presented of 3 separate experiments conducted in Bangalore, Karnataka, India, during 2002-03 and 2003-04 to investigate the occurrence of variability in grape cultivars (Flame Seedless, Thompson Seedless, Sharad Seedless and Tas-A-Ganesh), rootstocks (Dog Ridge, 1613 C, Salt Creek, St. George and VC clone) and buddings in respect of physiological behaviour and carbon isotope discrimination (CID). There was genetic variability in water use efficiency (WUE) with respect to CID. The behaviour of genotypes differed significantly in CID before and after budding on different rootstocks. Dog Ridge rootstock was known to increase WUE of Flame Seedless and Sharad Seedless when CID and other physiological parameters were compared. However, Thompson Seedless increased its WUE when budded on Dog Ridge, which is confirmed by the least CID in this combination at 50% stress.
Satisha, J; Prakash, G S

Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghata, Bangalore - 560 089, Karnataka, India.

Key words: budding, cultivars, genetic variation, grapes, plant water relations, rootstocks, water use efficiency

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 29-33.

Abstract: Results are presented of 3 separate experiments conducted in Bangalore, Karnataka, India, during 2002-03 and 2003-04 to investigate the occurrence of variability in grape cultivars (Flame Seedless, Thompson Seedless, Sharad Seedless and Tas-A-Ganesh), rootstocks (Dog Ridge, 1613 C, Salt Creek, St. George and VC clone) and buddings in respect of physiological behaviour and carbon isotope discrimination (CID). There was genetic variability in water use efficiency (WUE) with respect to CID. The behaviour of genotypes differed significantly in CID before and after budding on different rootstocks. Dog Ridge rootstock was known to increase WUE of Flame Seedless and Sharad Seedless when CID and other physiological parameters were compared. However, Thompson Seedless increased its WUE when budded on Dog Ridge, which is confirmed by the least CID in this combination at 50% stress.
Esmaeil Chamani; Ahmad Khalighi; Joyce, D C; Irving, D E; Zamani, Z A; Younes Mostofi; Mohsen Kafi

Centre for Native Floriculture, School of Agronomy and Horticulture, The University of Queensland, Gatton Queensland 4343, Australia.

Key words: cut flowers, ethylene, ethylene production, plant growth regulators, roses, senescence, silver thiosulfate, vase life

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 3-7.

Abstract: A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of ethylene and anti-ethylene treatments on the postharvest life of cut rose cv. First Red flowers. The treatments comprised: exogenous ethylene applied at 1, 10 and 100 micro l/litre for 48 h at 22 degrees C. Ethylene at different concentrations reduced postharvest life, with 100 micro l/litre having the greatest effect. Ethylene production measurements suggested that First Red is climacteric during senescence. Pre-treatment of First Red flowers with 0.5 mM silver thiosulfate (STS) for 2 h at 22 degrees C increased vase life, but pre-treatment with 1 micro l/litre 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) did not. Pre-treatment of First Red with 0.5 mM STS and, to a lesser extent, 1 micro l/litre 1-MCP for 2 h at 22 degrees C, protected flowers from subsequent exposure to 10 micro l/litre ethylene. Maximum vase life in both ethylene-treated and non-ethylene-treated First Red flowers was obtained with 0.5 mM STS.
Esmaeil Chamani; Ahmad Khalighi; Joyce, D C; Irving, D E; Zamani, Z A; Younes Mostofi; Mohsen Kafi

Centre for Native Floriculture, School of Agronomy and Horticulture, The University of Queensland, Gatton Queensland 4343, Australia.

Key words: cut flowers, ethylene, ethylene production, plant growth regulators, roses, senescence, silver thiosulfate, vase life

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 3-7.

Abstract: A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of ethylene and anti-ethylene treatments on the postharvest life of cut rose cv. First Red flowers. The treatments comprised: exogenous ethylene applied at 1, 10 and 100 micro l/litre for 48 h at 22 degrees C. Ethylene at different concentrations reduced postharvest life, with 100 micro l/litre having the greatest effect. Ethylene production measurements suggested that First Red is climacteric during senescence. Pre-treatment of First Red flowers with 0.5 mM silver thiosulfate (STS) for 2 h at 22 degrees C increased vase life, but pre-treatment with 1 micro l/litre 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) did not. Pre-treatment of First Red with 0.5 mM STS and, to a lesser extent, 1 micro l/litre 1-MCP for 2 h at 22 degrees C, protected flowers from subsequent exposure to 10 micro l/litre ethylene. Maximum vase life in both ethylene-treated and non-ethylene-treated First Red flowers was obtained with 0.5 mM STS.
Mishra, D K; Mishra, H R; Yadava, L P

K.A. Post Graduate Degree College, Allahabad (UP), India.

Key words: application methods, application rates, branches, flowering, growth, growth retardants, paclobutrazol, plant development, plant growth regulators, plant height, root shoot ratio, roots, shoots

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 34-37.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted during 2002-03 in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India, to determine the optimum dose (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 ppm) and method of application (root dip, soil drench and foliar spray) of paclobutrazol to improve the growth, flowering and aesthetic value of China aster (Callistephus chinensis) cv. Poornima. Paclobutrazol at 200 ppm as soil drench was the most effective in retarding plant height. The highest number of branches per plant was observed with 25 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench while lower number of branches per plant was observed with 200 ppm as soil drench. The number of leaves and total leaf area per plant significantly decreased with increased concentration of paclobutrazol irrespective of the methods of application. The soil drench method registered maximum enhancement of root:shoot ratio than foliar spray and root dip at all levels of paclobutrazol. Maximum enhancement of root:shoot length ratio was observed due to 200 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench method. The maximum d
Mishra, D K; Mishra, H R; Yadava, L P

K.A. Post Graduate Degree College, Allahabad (UP), India.

Key words: application methods, application rates, branches, flowering, growth, growth retardants, paclobutrazol, plant development, plant growth regulators, plant height, root shoot ratio, roots, shoots

Journal of Applied Horticulture, 2005, volume 7, issue 1, pages 34-37.

Abstract: An experiment was conducted during 2002-03 in Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India, to determine the optimum dose (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 ppm) and method of application (root dip, soil drench and foliar spray) of paclobutrazol to improve the growth, flowering and aesthetic value of China aster (Callistephus chinensis) cv. Poornima. Paclobutrazol at 200 ppm as soil drench was the most effective in retarding plant height. The highest number of branches per plant was observed with 25 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench while lower number of branches per plant was observed with 200 ppm as soil drench. The number of leaves and total leaf area per plant significantly decreased with increased concentration of paclobutrazol irrespective of the methods of application. The soil drench method registered maximum enhancement of root:shoot ratio than foliar spray and root dip at all levels of paclobutrazol. Maximum enhancement of root:shoot length ratio was observed due to 200 ppm paclobutrazol as soil drench method. The maximum d

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Journal of Applied Horticulture